12_04

Captured by Anna Riwkin in Holland, together with Charles Behrens, sketch-artist and finance man.

12_03

In Chicago on an assignment for Damernas Värld (a women’s magazine).
The trip resulted in a long series of articles which later turned into a book, Kati in America.
In the book she uses Kati to exclaim: “I was standing by the window of our hotel room and I was shivering with excitement.”

12_02

In Chicago on an assignment for Damernas Värld (a women’s magazine).
The trip resulted in a long series of articles which later turned into a book, Kati in America.
In the book she uses Kati to exclaim: “I was standing by the window of our hotel room and I was shivering with excitement.”

12_01

Astrid makes many trips abroad.
Sometimes together with her husband, other times alone on journalistic excursions and sometimes
together with Anna Riwkin, working on some joint book venture.
She travels to America by air, as early as 1948 – something that was considered very exotic at the time.
It was much more common to sail with the Swedish-American Line.

World traveller

11_05

The Bullerby children drawn by Ingrid Vang Nyman.

11_04

The grandpa in the books is modelled on Astrid’s own grandpa.
Here he is, sitting under the cherry tree, in Ingrid Vang Nyman’s illustration.

11_03

Astrid on a visit to Sevedstorp.

11_02

The Sevedstorp property where Samuel August grew up
is the outward model for Bullerby. That is where Lasse Hallström’s film about
the Bullerby children was shot. The village is visited by thousands of people every year.

11_01

In 1946 Astrid wrote the book, The six Bullerby children.
Astrid has said that she took the setting from Sevedstorp where her father Samuel August grew up,
but that what happens in the books is taken from her childhood at Näs. She says,
“You could say that I myself was a Bullerby child. Not exactly as in the books,
of course, because authors lie a little bit too – it wouldn’t work otherwise – but
we were a bunch of kids who played like there was no tomorrow!”

The six Bullerby children

10_06

In 1955 Astrid gets her driver’s licence and is now able to drive
the car between her home on Dalagatan and the summer house in Furusund.
She takes her final driving test two days before Christmas Eve and jokingly says to the examiner
that he couldn’t possibly fail her “...it being so close to Christmas and all” – and he doesn’t.

10_05

Her typewriter and her glasses on the desk.

10_04

Here, by the window overlooking Vasaparken, Astrid typed up her manuscripts.

10_03

The first versions of a manuscript were always written in bed by Astrid, using shorthand.

10_02

Together with her colleague, Marianne Eriksson
outside the publishing house in the mid-80’s.

10_01

In 1946 Astrid begins working as children’s book editor for the
Rabén & Sjögren publishing house where she later becomes responsible
for all the distribution of children’s books up until 1970.
In order to keep up with her life as mother, wife, editor/publisher and prolific writer
she uses shorthand to write her stories in bed, early in the mornings,
before spending the afternoons at the publishing house in Tegnérgatan. Astrid pictured
here together with Hans Rabén on his 60th
birthday.

Astrid, the Career Woman

09_05

Sonja Melin was one of Karin’s school friends.
Her appearance, along with her wild behaviour at a children’s party,
became an important source of inspiration for how Astrid imagined Pippi Longstocking to be.

09_04

This is the original manuscript for Pippi Longstocking
as presented to her daughter, Karin on her 10th birthday.
Here, you can even see Astrid’s own drawing of Pippi.

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