The Parents

An important source of inspiration for Astrid was the family life of her childhood, and most particularly her parents, Samuel August Ericsson (1875-1969) and Hanna Jonsson (1879-1961). They got married in 1905 and Astrid was born two years later. Her book Samuel August från Sevedstorp och Hanna i Hult is the story of her parents, which was voted “Love Story of the Millennium” by the Swedish people in 1999.

The Parents

Samuel August and Hanna are loving parents who give their children two important foundation stones for a happy childhood – security and freedom.

The Parents

Three generations of farmers from Näs – Astrid’s father Samuel August, her grandfather Samuel and on his lap, her brother Gunnar. Grandpa Samuel was the model for “the kindest Grandpa in the world” in the Bullerby books. Lisa’s big brother Lars, in the same series of books, has been modelled on Astrid’s brother Gunnar.

The Parents

Samuel August talked his parents into applying for the lease of the Näs Rectory in Vimmerby. Over the years, Samuel August became a respected farmer and Council representative – just like Emil in Lönneberga.

The Parents

Hanna Jonsson wrote poetry at a young age and dreamed of becoming a teacher, but had only 6 years schooling. Instead of becoming a teacher she ended up shouldering the responsibility of being the farmer’s wife at one of the largest homesteads in Kalmar Shire and the loving mother of four children.

Growing up

Astrid’s childhood on the Näs property at the beginning of the last century was a happy time. Her parents did not care too much about missed mealtimes or dirtied clothes. The games, the friends and the natural surroundings were important parts of Astrid’s growing up years and so were books. This is a quote from Astrid about her childhood: “And we played and played and played. It’s a wonder we didn’t play ourselves to death!” Here are the siblings Stina, Gunnar and Astrid.

Growing up

The first photograph of Astrid and her brother Gunnar.

Growing up

Astrid and Gunnar together with their friends Edit and Anne-Marie.

Growing up

Half-Term Report from Vimmerby Public School.

Growing up

Astrid putting her hand up during a German lesson at her school in Vimmerby.

The Childhood Home

In 1895, Astrid’s grandparents took over the lease of the Näs Rectory and moved into the red house. This was where Astrid grew up. In time, Samuel August took over the lease from his father and worked the farm for almost half a century until Gunnar, in turn, took over the responsibility. In 1965, when the property ceased to be a farm, the animals and equipment were sold off at auction. Astrid and Gunnar bought the buildings and some of the adjoining land.

The Childhood Home

The extended family gathered at Näs in 1915. Samuel August, Hanna and the children along with maids and farmhands.

The Childhood Home

In 1971, Vimmerby Council decided to have the fire brigade burn down the barn that Samuel August had built back in the 20’s. Measuring 105m, it was the “longest barn in North Kalmar Shire”.

The Childhood Home

The bedroom at Näs. Astrid was born in the bed by the window. And this is the room where the children played “don’t step on the floor”, just like Pippi Longstocking.

Her Teenage Years

Astrid’s memories of her childhood were happy ones, but in spite of having had a large circle of friends, her memories of her teens were not as positive. “Life in my teens was just a flat, empty existence – I was often melancholic. Like most teenagers, I thought I was ugly and never did I fall in love, either.” In 1923 Astrid was confirmed by the Rev Höglander in Vimmerby. In 1926 she moved to Stockholm and acquired qualifications as a shorthand/typist.

Her Teenage Years

In the Confirmation photo, Astrid is in the back row, third from the left.

Her Teenage Years

In 1924, Astrid’s friend Anne-Marie (Madicken) turns 17 and is visited by her girlfriends, all dressed up as suitors come to court her. Astrid is at the far right of the picture.

Her Teenage Years

In the autumn of 1926, Astrid has moved to a rented room in Östermalm (East Stockholm). Pictured here with her friend, Saga at Nybrokajen in Stockholm.

Her Teenage Years

Entertainment in Stockholm is expensive for an office girl in the 20’s. But the friends throw parties now and then, like this masquerade where Astrid can be seen at the front wearing a hat.

Her First Job

By the age of 13, Astrid has already had a composition, “På vår gård” (On our Property) published in the Vimmerby Tidning (Vimmerby Times). And, in 1924, the Editor-in-Chief Reinhold Blomberg, needing a voluntary worker to join the paper, asks Samuel August if Astrid might be interested. She begins by writing notices and theatre reviews. She also does proofreading, answers the telephone, runs errands and writes advertisements and death notices. After only a short time she is also entrusted with the task of providing journalistic articles for the paper.

Her First Job

The Vimmerby Tidning editorial office is located on Storgatan in the centre of Vimmerby.

Her First Job

Astrid’s longest series of articles for Vimmerby Tidning was the travelogue, På Luffen (Take a Hike). Over the course of ten days, she and her girl-friends journey 300km on foot through northern Småland and Östergötland. They finish off their trip with a taxi ride. Astrid is third from the left in the car.

Her First Job

Reinhold Blomberg, Editor-in-Chief gives Astrid a nice letter of recommendation when she leaves the paper.

Lars, her First Child

In 1926 Astrid gives birth to her first child, Lars. She does not want to set up family with his father, a man 30 years her senior, but leaves Vimmerby and has her baby in Copenhagen, at the only hospital in Scandinavia where you do not have to provide the name of the father. Lars lives in a foster home the first three years whilst Astrid has to make a living in Stockholm. In 1930, Lars comes to live with his grandparents at Näs where he spends a year before Astrid is able to bring him home to Stockholm. Lars eventually becomes an engineer and has a family of his own. He has three children – two sons and a daughter.

Lars, her First Child

For the first three years of his life, Lars lives with a family in Copenhagen. Astrid makes the 14-hour journey to Copenhagen as often as she is able. In 1930 she brings Lars home to Sweden for good.

Lars, her First Child

For the first three years of his life, Lars lives with a family in Copenhagen. Astrid makes the 14-hour journey to Copenhagen as often as she is able. In 1930 she brings Lars home to Sweden for good.

Lars, her First Child

Lars often stays at Näs during his first few years in Sweden. When he arrives in Vimmerby, he is speaking Danish, but within a few months the Småland dialect has taken over entirely.

Lars, her First Child

Lars often stays at Näs during his first few years in Sweden. When he arrives in Vimmerby, he is speaking Danish, but within a few months the Småland dialect has taken over entirely.

Lars, her First Child

In the spring of 1947, Astrid has the joy of congratulating her son as he graduates from Senior High School. Pictured together at home, on Dalagatan.

Sture, her Husband

In 1928 Astrid works as a secretary at the Royal Swedish Automobile Club (KAK), where she meets her future husband, the office manager, Sture Lindgren. They get married in Vimmerby. After the wedding, they move into an apartment on Vulcanusgatan in Stockholm, not far from where Astrid has been renting a room for a few years. Astrid becomes a housewife and loves being able to play with Lars every day. Sture dies in 1952 from an internal haemorrhage, only 53 years old. Astrid never remarried.

Sture, her Husband

The interest in books is of course something they have in common.

Sture, her Husband

The wedding is held on the ground floor of the new house at Näs – Easter Saturday 1931.

Sture, her Husband

Through Sture’s work as manager, first at the Royal Swedish Automobile Club (KAK) and later as CEO of the Swedish Automobile Association (Motormännens Riksförbund), he and Astrid got to do a lot of travelling. Here pictured having dinner with the association’s lawyer, Karl-Erik Hedner and his wife Brita.

Sture, her Husband

Astrid at the International Grand Prix in Skåne (1933) in her role as secretary for the Royal Swedish Automobile Club (KAK).

Karin, her daughter

A daughter, Karin, is born to Astrid and Sture on 21st May 1934 – and Astrid gets her hands full with two children at home. It is Karin who, on the spur of the moment, invents the name Pippi Longstocking whilst lying sick in bed, nagging her mum Astrid to tell her a story.

Karin, her daughter

During Karin’s early childhood, Astrid often spends the daytime in Vasaparken. This is where she meets Alli Viridén who has a daughter (Margareta) the same age as Karin. Alli and Astrid become friends for life.

Karin, her daughter

Summers are spent at Furusund (in Stockholm’s archipelago) enjoying the sun and the sea.

Karin, her daughter

Karin lives at home until she gets married in 1958 to Carl Olof Nyman, but the close contact between mother and daughter is never broken. Karin and Carl Olof have four children – three boys and one girl.

Karin, her daughter

Karin lives at home until she gets married in 1958 to Carl Olof Nyman, but the close contact between mother and daughter is never broken. Karin and Carl Olof have four children – three boys and one girl.

Pippi Longstocking

When Astrid’s daughter Karin is a little girl, Astrid often tells her stories about a girl called Pippi Longstocking. And for Karin’s 10th birthday, Astrid gets the idea of writing down all the stories about Pippi. Having done so, she gives the original to Karin as a present and sends a copy to Albert Bonniers Förlag (Albert Bonnier’s Publishers). They reject the manuscript, but by this time Astrid has discovered the joys of writing books. She quickly writes another story, Britt-Mari lättar sitt hjärta, which wins her 2nd Prize in Rabén & Sjögren’s girls’ book competition. The firm publishes both Britt-Mari lättar sitt hjärta (1944) and Pippi Longstocking (1945).

Pippi Longstocking

In Sweden, Ingrid Vang Nyman’s illustrations are synonymous with Pippi Longstocking.

Pippi Longstocking

In other countries, Pippi might look a little different, but everybody sticks to Astrid’s original concept of a girl with red hair in plaits.

Pippi Longstocking

This is the original manuscript for Pippi Longstocking as presented to her daughter, Karin on her 10th birthday. Here, you can even see Astrid’s own drawing of Pippi.

Pippi Longstocking

Sonja Melin was one of Karin’s school friends. Her appearance, along with her wild behaviour at a children’s party, became an important source of inspiration for how Astrid imagined Pippi Longstocking to be.

Astrid, the Career Woman

In 1946 Astrid begins working as children’s book editor for the Rabén & Sjögren publishing house where she later becomes responsible for all the distribution of children’s books up until 1970. In order to keep up with her life as mother, wife, editor/publisher and prolific writer she uses shorthand to write her stories in bed, early in the mornings, before spending the afternoons at the publishing house in Tegnérgatan. Astrid pictured here together with Hans Rabén on his 60th birthday.

Astrid, the Career Woman

Together with her colleague, Marianne Eriksson outside the publishing house in the mid-80’s.

Astrid, the Career Woman

The first versions of a manuscript were always written in bed by Astrid, using shorthand.

Astrid, the Career Woman

Here, by the window overlooking Vasaparken, Astrid typed up her manuscripts.

Astrid, the Career Woman

Her typewriter and her glasses on the desk.

Astrid, the Career Woman

In 1955 Astrid gets her driver’s licence and is now able to drive the car between her home on Dalagatan and the summer house in Furusund. She takes her final driving test two days before Christmas Eve and jokingly says to the examiner that he couldn’t possibly fail her “...it being so close to Christmas and all” – and he doesn’t.

The six Bullerby children

In 1946 Astrid wrote the book, The six Bullerby children. Astrid has said that she took the setting from Sevedstorp where her father Samuel August grew up, but that what happens in the books is taken from her childhood at Näs. She says, “You could say that I myself was a Bullerby child. Not exactly as in the books, of course, because authors lie a little bit too – it wouldn’t work otherwise – but we were a bunch of kids who played like there was no tomorrow!”

The six Bullerby children

The Sevedstorp property where Samuel August grew up is the outward model for Bullerby. That is where Lasse Hallström’s film about the Bullerby children was shot. The village is visited by thousands of people every year.

The six Bullerby children

Astrid on a visit to Sevedstorp.

The six Bullerby children

The grandpa in the books is modelled on Astrid’s own grandpa. Here he is, sitting under the cherry tree, in Ingrid Vang Nyman’s illustration.

The six Bullerby children

The Bullerby children drawn by Ingrid Vang Nyman.

World traveller

Astrid makes many trips abroad. Sometimes together with her husband, other times alone on journalistic excursions and sometimes together with Anna Riwkin, working on some joint book venture. She travels to America by air, as early as 1948 – something that was considered very exotic at the time. It was much more common to sail with the Swedish-American Line.

World traveller

In Chicago on an assignment for Damernas Värld (a women’s magazine). The trip resulted in a long series of articles which later turned into a book, Kati in America. In the book she uses Kati to exclaim: “I was standing by the window of our hotel room and I was shivering with excitement.”

World traveller

In Chicago on an assignment for Damernas Värld (a women’s magazine). The trip resulted in a long series of articles which later turned into a book, Kati in America. In the book she uses Kati to exclaim: “I was standing by the window of our hotel room and I was shivering with excitement.”

World traveller

Astrid together with the girls in the book, Gerda lives in Norway.

World traveller

Visiting Milan in connection with one of Sture’s many business trips abroad.

World traveller

Captured by Anna Riwkin in Holland, together with Charles Behrens, sketch-artist and finance man.

Mio, My Son

Astrid Lindgren has mostly written stories of a different genre, but Mio, My Son, released in 1954 is a classical fairytale. The story of Karl Anders Nilsson was first published as a shorter version intended for a magazine. The inspiration came from a walk in Tegnérlunden (a park in Stockholm) where she saw a little boy sitting on a bench. It got her imagination going and out of it grew the fairytale about Mio. Initially, Astrid had not intended to write any more than that first chapter, but some years later she started to wonder how things were going for the little boy and proceeded to write a whole book about him.

Mio, My Son

Astrid often went for walks around her beloved Vasastan (an area of Stockholm). One day she saw a boy sitting alone on a park bench in Tegnérlunden. That picture triggered her imagination and became the first seeds of Mio, My Son.

Mio, My Son

In 1953 a young illustrator turned up at Rabén & Sjögren, asking if they might have any work for her. Ilon Wikland was introduced to Astrid Lindgren and began to show her some sample pictures. Astrid thought “this girl can draw fairytales” and gave her the assignment of creating the illustrations for Mio, My Son. Since then, Ilon has illustrated many of Astrid’s books.

Mio, My Son

The book is full of stark contrasts, where you experience bright, happy moments but also darkness and evil. This is captured very well in Ilon Wikland’s illustrations.

Mio, My Son

The book is full of stark contrasts, where you experience bright, happy moments but also darkness and evil. This is captured very well in Ilon Wikland’s illustrations.

Emil i Lönneberga

With the book Emil i Lönneberga, Astrid returns to her father’s Småland – the stage of her own childhood. And Emil was one of the most favourite characters for both Astrid and her father. She said, “Emil, you know that’s exactly the Småland of my own childhood, and ... I like that character so much that when I’d finished writing the last book about him, I cried.”

Emil i Lönneberga

The environment depicted in the Emil books is inspired by Astrid’s own childhood at Näs. Here is a picture of Lina’s kitchen sofa by the illustrator, Björn Berg.

Emil i Lönneberga

Here you see Lina’s kitchen sofa in a recent photograph of the kitchen where Astrid grew up.

Emil i Lönneberga

Astrid in the kitchen at Näs.

Emil i Lönneberga

The place called Katthult is an invention of Astrid Lindgren, but Vimmerby and Mariannelund – places visited by Emil in the books – exist in real life.

Emil i Lönneberga

Just like Emil i Lönneberga, Astrid grew up in a large family with maids and farmhands.

Seacrow Island

After 30 years of spending every summer in Furusund (part of the Stockholm archipelago), Astrid was ready to start writing about life out there. In 1963 Seacrow Island was produced – Astrid’s first series specially written for TV. The cast was found with the help of one of the national News programmes and within a year the first series was ready to be aired.

Seacrow Island

During the screen-tests, the initial intention was to have Kristina Jämtmark playing the part of Tjorven, but after meeting Maria Johansson the film crew chose her. Everyone was still so enchanted with Kristina Jämtmark, however, that Astrid quickly wrote in the Stina part especially for her. In these pictures we see Maria and Kristina together with Stephen Lindholm who plays Pelle in the series, on a visit with Astrid at the summer house in Furusund.

Seacrow Island

During the screen-tests, the initial intention was to have Kristina Jämtmark playing the part of Tjorven, but after meeting Maria Johansson the film crew chose her. Everyone was still so enchanted with Kristina Jämtmark, however, that Astrid quickly wrote in the Stina part especially for her. In these pictures we see Maria and Kristina together with Stephen Lindholm who plays Pelle in the series, on a visit with Astrid at the summer house in Furusund.

Seacrow Island

Astrid spent a lot of time on location during the filming of the Seacrow Island series.

Seacrow Island

Seacrow Island was the fourth project Astrid and Olle Hellbom (to the right in the photo) had been working on together. They collaborated over a period of two decades, and together they made 17 films and TV series.

Seacrow Island

Here is Astrid together with some of the cast at the première of Tjorven och Mysak.

The Films about Pippi Longstocking

When Pippi Longstocking was going to be filmed for TV in 1968, Olle Hellbom was the director. The theme song, “Here comes Pippi Longstocking” was written by Jan Johansson who had been inspired by Ghana’s Police Orchestra, amongst others. 8,000 girls applied for the role of Pippi which finally went to Inger Nilsson from Kisa. Astrid visited the film location on several occasions, but she mostly served “backstage” ready to help via the telephone providing an extra line or in the case of some scenes needing to be added to or changed.

The Films about Pippi Longstocking

Olle Hellbom knew he had found his Pippi Longstocking the moment Inger Nilsson walked in the door during the last screen-test. “All the others had only dressed up as Pippi, but this Inger had that extra something. She had Pippi on the inside.”

The Films about Pippi Longstocking

Many of the film scenes were shot in Visby on the island of Gotland. In the books, Pippi wears a blue dress, but that did not work on the screen since many of the effects were shot against a blue background, and that would have totally obliterated Pippi’s dress had it been blue.

The Films about Pippi Longstocking

Many of the film scenes were shot in Visby on the island of Gotland. In the books, Pippi wears a blue dress, but that did not work on the screen since many of the effects were shot against a blue background, and that would have totally obliterated Pippi’s dress had it been blue.

The Films about Pippi Longstocking

Many of the film scenes were shot in Visby on the island of Gotland. In the books, Pippi wears a blue dress, but that did not work on the screen since many of the effects were shot against a blue background, and that would have totally obliterated Pippi’s dress had it been blue.

The Film about Emil i Lönneberga

In 1970 the decision was made to make a film based on the Emil books. After the première of the first film, the critics were cool and yet the general public loved both the movies and the TV series. It was the first time that Allan Edwall played a part in an Astrid Lindgren film. After that he appears in almost every film made by the Lindgren-Hellbom “duo”. The location chosen for the filming was a small property in Gibberyd, not far from Vimmerby. Today, it is one of Sweden’s most frequently visited farms, receiving hundreds of thousands of tourists during the summer months.

The Film about Emil i Lönneberga

When Ida was going to be hoisted up the flagpole, she steadfastlyly refused. Not until the film-crew appeased her with a bit of ballthrowing did she allow them to hoist her up – a little bit. So it continued: “catch the ball!” – a bit higher. Throw the ball again – hoist her up a bit more, until she was 3 metres above the ground, which was high enough to catch her on film.

The Film about Emil i Lönneberga

Thousands of boys wanted the role of Emil i Lönneberga. This is the photograph of Janne Ohlsson which the casting department had in front of them as a guide in helping them select the right applicant.

The Film about Emil i Lönneberga

Astrid Lindgren pictured with some of the film-crew at the première. The Emil movies were always premièred at “The Grand” cinema in Vimmerby.

The Film about Emil i Lönneberga

When we see Astrid Lindgren sweep by at the Vimmerby Fair in the film, Emil i Lönneberga it is the only time she appears in a movie.

The Film about the Brothers Lionheart

The filming of the Brothers Lionheart was to be the last project Astrid Lindgren and Olle Hellbom worked on together. The film is also the only one of their works which was not allowed to be shown to children under 11 years at the cinemas. Strong protests were coming from the general public and the cultural establishment.
Jan-Erik Wikström was Minister for Education at the time and he entered into the debate, with the result that the age limit was lowered to 7 years: Lex Lejonhjärta.

The Film about the Brothers Lionheart

Picture from the film’s première in Berlin 1977.

The Film about the Brothers Lionheart

The part of Jonatan is played by Staffan Götestam, who has since then mounted several productions of Astrid Lindgren’s work for the stage. Scotty (Skorpan) is played by Lars Söderdahl who also played Smidge (Lillebror) in the film about Karlsson-on-the-Roof. Here they are at the film première in Moscow.

The Trendsetter

Astrid Lindgren often took a stand on issues to do with the treatment of children, animals and refugees, but her breakthrough into the public debate came when she wrote her satirical fairytale, Pomperipossa in Monismania (1976). Two years later she was awarded the German Booksellers’ Peace Award, and her acceptance speech at the ceremony became the catalyst for an international debate about the use of corporal punishment in bringing up children. Another law came about as a result of a campaign run by Astrid Lindgren and the veterinary, Kristina Forslund. This was the new animal protection law (1988).

The Trendsetter

Gunnar Sträng (the then Minister for Finance) reading the fairytale, Pomperipossa in Monismania. Though she herself was a Social Democrat, Astrid protested against the Social Democratic government that had introduced a law demanding a marginal tax of more than 100% from certain private companies. For her personally, this would have meant paying her entire income + 200 kronor in tax that year. The ensuing debate led to that law being changed.

The Trendsetter

Astrid took a stand against all types of violence. Captured here in connection with an article entitled, Stop Skinheading!

The Trendsetter

Astrid Lindgren about to receive the German Booksellers’ Peace Award. In her acceptance speech, she provoked many listeners by drawing parallels between war and the use of corporal punishment in child-raising. The debate that followed resulted in Sweden becoming the first country in the world to forbid corporal punishment of children.

Ronia, the Robber’s Daughter

In 1981 the book, Ronia the Robber’s Daughter is released. Astrid is now 74 years of age, and this is to be her last book. Filming of the book is commenced as usual, together with Olle Hellbom. But right in the middle of the preparations, Olle Hellbom dies from cancer at the early age of 56. Tage Danielsson takes over as director of the film and the result is outstanding.

Ronia, the Robber’s Daughter

Most of the scenes in the Ronia film were shot in Dalsland Shire. But the famous last scene, where the meadows are filled with white spring flowers was set on Väderö, an island in the County of Halland.

Ronia, the Robber’s Daughter

Hanna Zetterberg who played the part of Ronia had some drama experience from Vår Teater (Our Theatre), but Jan Håfström who played Birk had had no previous acting experience whatsoever.

Ronia, the Robber’s Daughter

During the filming, Astrid did not turn up as often as she had for earlier films, but she was still constantly available on the phone, to help with queries to do with the script or the various characterisations. It had now become customary that whenever an Astrid Lindgren film is being made, Allan Edwall would have a part. This time he is cast in the role of Noddle-Pete.

The Animal Lover

Astrid’s interest in animals and nature expressed itself in many ways, and she put much effort into promoting the idea that man must use the earth’s resources wisely and carefully. She was a board member of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), a supporter of Greenpeace, led the mobilisation of support for the open landscape and was a campaigner, together with the veterinary Kristina Forslund, against cruel factory farming practices. Her involvement earned her several awards including the Albert Schweitzer Medal and “Årets Djurvän” (Animal Lover of the Year).

The Animal Lover

The former Prime Minister of Sweden, Ingvar Carlsson introduced a new animal protection law, following a debate initiated by Astrid Lindgren. Astrid later called the law “toothless”, however, because it was not radical enough.

The Animal Lover

In 1986, Astrid Lindgren receives an award from the Swedish Society for the Protection of Animals entitled, “Årets Djurvän” (Animal Lover of the Year).

The Animal Lover

All her life Astrid had a soft spot for children and animals. Here, seen with a calf in freedom, just as Astrid would have it – in sharp contrast with the main picture which shows the cattle at the Prime Minister’s property, Harpsund in October, 1990. The pictures were used as illustrations in one of the many thoughtprovoking articles that Astrid produced in collaboration with the Associate Professor and veterinary, Kristina Forslund. What began as an article led to a whole book as well as a brand new animal protection law.

The last years

In 1998, at the age of 91, Astrid Lindgren suffers a stroke and she finds it increasingly difficult to get around. She no longer participates in public events, but continues to go for walks in Vasaparken and she still spends her summers in Furusund, in the Stockholm archipelago. She progressively loses both sight and hearing, but she never loses her sense of humour. When asked what she would like for her 94th birthday, she says: “Peace on earth and some nice clothes”. She is pictured here with Crown Princess Victoria during the ceremony at Junibacken where she received the award, “Worldwide Swede of the Year” (1997).

The last years

During her final years, Astrid made fewer and fewer public appearances, and after her 90th birthday virtually withdrew altogether.

The last years

Even in her old age, Astrid was outgoing and friendly – her warm humour never ceasing.

The last years

The three sisters from Näs kept almost daily contact right up to the end.

The last years

Astrid may not have climbed any trees during the last years of her life, but she was certainly a keen tree-climber well into her ripe old age. And the playfulness stayed with her throughout her life.

Resting in Peace

After spending Christmas with the family in 2001, Astrid gets sick with influenza and never fully recovers. On 28th January 2002 she passes away quietly in her home. The funeral is held on 8th March – International Women’s Day. The streets of Stockholm are crowded with thousands of people following the cortege from Adolf Fredrik’s Church (where the immediate family take their farewells) to the Great Church in the Old Town where the official part of the funeral is held. The funeral service is attended by the Royal Family and an obituary is read by the Prime Minister.

Resting in Peace

She is later buried in the family grave in Vimmerby and Astrid Lindgren is once again reunited with her parents, Samuel August and Hanna.